The Breed of Roy Rogers’ Horse Trigger

Trigger, the beloved equine companion of singing cowboy Roy Rogers, was a remarkable horse known for his iconic golden coat color. This article explores the breed and background of Trigger, shedding light on his lineage and contributions to the film industry. The information presented in this article is based on reliable sources, including Horse Illustrated, Wikipedia, and Saddle Up Colorado.

Trigger’s Palomino Coat

Trigger was a palomino horse, renowned for his stunning golden coat. The palomino coloration is characterized by a lustrous, creamy or gold coat with a white or flaxen mane and tail. This distinctive appearance made Trigger instantly recognizable and captured the hearts of many admirers.

Parentage and Lineage

Trigger’s sire, or father, was a Thoroughbred, a breed known for its speed and athleticism. Meanwhile, his dam, or mother, was believed to be a Quarter Horse mix. This combination of bloodlines contributed to Trigger’s unique characteristics and abilities.

Trigger’s Birth and Origin

Trigger was born on July 4, 1934, in San Diego, California. His early years laid the foundation for his extraordinary career and established him as an enduring symbol of the American West.

Clarifying Trigger’s Breed

Despite popular misconceptions, Trigger was often mistaken for a Tennessee Walking Horse. However, his lineage consisted of a Thoroughbred sire and a grade mare, which refers to an unregistered horse of mixed breeding. This clarifies Trigger’s true breed and highlights the influence of his diverse heritage.

The Renaming of Golden Cloud

Initially named “Golden Cloud,” Trigger acquired his famous moniker due to his exceptional quickness of both foot and mind. Roy Rogers recognized these remarkable attributes and rechristened the horse as Trigger, a name befitting his spirited and energetic nature.

Trigger’s Cinematic Stardom

Trigger achieved widespread fame through his appearances in American Western films alongside Roy Rogers. Together, they formed an iconic duo that captivated audiences on both the big and small screens during the 1940s and 50s. Their enduring partnership left an indelible mark on the entertainment industry.

Trigger’s Extraordinary Talents

Trigger’s intelligence and trainability allowed him to learn an impressive repertoire of over 150 trick cues. He showcased his extraordinary abilities by performing captivating tricks, including walking on his hind legs and even signing his name with a pencil. Trigger’s versatility and showmanship made him a true legend in the realm of equine performers.

In conclusion, Trigger, the palomino horse with a golden coat, was a breed combination of a Thoroughbred sire and a Quarter Horse mix dam. Born on July 4, 1934, in San Diego, California, Trigger became an iconic figure in American Western films through his partnership with Roy Rogers. Renowned for his intelligence and exceptional talents, Trigger’s legacy as a beloved and talented performer lives on.

FAQs

What breed was Roy Rogers’ horse Trigger?

Trigger was a mixed-breed horse with a Thoroughbred sire and a Quarter Horse mix dam. Despite popular misconceptions, he was often mistaken for a Tennessee Walking Horse.

What was the original name of Trigger?



Trigger’s original name was Golden Cloud. He was later renamed by Roy Rogers due to his remarkable quickness of both foot and mind.

When and where was Trigger born?

Trigger was born on July 4, 1934, in San Diego, California.

What made Trigger famous?

Trigger became famous for his appearances in American Western films alongside Roy Rogers. Their partnership captivated audiences and left an indelible mark on the entertainment industry.

What were some of Trigger’s impressive talents?

Trigger was a highly intelligent and trainable horse. He learned over 150 trick cues and could perform remarkable feats such as walking on his hind legs and signing his name with a pencil.

What was the coat color of Trigger?



Trigger had a palomino coat, which is characterized by a golden color with a white or flaxen mane and tail.

What were Trigger’s parentage and lineage?

Trigger’s sire was a Thoroughbred, known for its speed and athleticism, while his dam was believed to be a Quarter Horse mix.

Was Trigger a registered breed?

No, Trigger was a grade horse, which means he was not registered and had mixed breeding.